Daily Dialogue — March 25, 2013

March 25th, 2013 by

Kicking Bird: [in Lakota; addressing the village council] He may be a special man or even a god. I ask that Chief Ten Bears give us permission to talk with him.

Murmurs around the council as Wind in his Hair rises to speak.

Wind In His Hair: [in Lakota; subtitled] I do not care for this talk about a white man at the soldier fort. Who ever he is he is not a Sioux and that makes him less. We took more then a hundred horses from these people and there was no honor in it. They don’t ride well. They don’t shoot well. They’re dirty. Those so-called “soldiers” could not make it through one winter in our country. And all these people are said to flourish? I think they will all be dead soon… maybe in ten years.

Murmurs circulate around the council.

Wind In His Hair: [in Lakota] I think this fool is probably lost.

The council laughs as Wind in his Hair sits back down and Kicking Bird raises his right hand as a call for silence.

Kicking Bird: [in Lakota; subtitled] Wind in his Hair has spoken and his words are strong. It is true that the whites are a poor race and it is hard to understand them. But make no mistake, the whites are coming. Even our enemies agree on this. But when I see one white man alone and without fear in our country, I do not think he is lost. I think he may have medicine. I think this is a man who will speak for all white people. I think this is a man from which treaties may be struck.

Dances With Wolves (1990), screenplay by Michael Blake from his own novel

The Daily Dialogue theme for the week is culture clash suggested by Debbie Moon who also provided today’s example.

Trivia: Michael Blake wrote a spec screenplay in the early 1980s. When Kevin Costner came across the project in 1986, he suggested to Blake that he should turn it into a novel, thereby increasing his chances of getting it made into a film. Blake did so and, after many rejections, found a publisher in 1988. Costner immediately snapped up the movie rights with an eye to directing it himself.

Dialogue On Dialogue: Commentary from Debbie: “What’s great about this is that we’re seeing that the “natives” have just as much contempt for the white man as he has for them – and even level much the same insults at him. There’s no moral high ground when two cultures come into conflict.”

2 thoughts on “Daily Dialogue — March 25, 2013

  1. blknwite says:

    Crash by Paul Haggis

    http://youtu.be/L-iyxIincCI

    EXT. DANIEL’S BUNGALOW – WESTCHESTER — LATE AFTERNOON
    Farhad watches in his rearview mirror as Daniel’s truck glides down the street and pulls into his driveway, giving a little
    toot of his horn.
    INT. DANIEL’S BUNGALOW — CONTINUOUS
    Lara runs to the window, sees that …
    LARA
    Daddy’s home!
    EXT. DANIEL’S BUNGALOW — CONTINUOUS
    Farhad opens the door of his Honda and starts across the street, toward the truck in the driveway, toward Daniel,
    walking down the sidewalk. Daniel looks up, momentarily confused{ recognizing Farhad but not remembering from where.
    LARA opens the front door as …
    FARHAD raises the pistol and steps right up to Daniel …
    FARHAD
    You give my money.
    DANIEL
    What? what money?
    LARA
    Daddy?
    DANIEL
    (calling)
    ELIZABETH! Come get Lara!
    LARA
    Daddy?
    FARHAn
    You pay my store! Give my money!
    You pay my store!
    LARA
    Daddy?
    DANIEL
    You go inside, honey. Elizabeth!!
    LARA
    Mommy?
    INT. DANIEL’S BUNGALOW CONTINUOUS
    The CAMERA SWOOPS in from the living room to find Elizabeth
    washing dishes, unable to hear because of the running water.
    EXT. DANIEL’S BUNGALOW CONTINUOUS
    FARHAn
    I want money! You give me truck!
    DANIEL
    It’s not my truck!
    LARA
    Daddy!
    DANIEL
    Elizabeth! !
    INT. DANIEL’S BUNGALOW — CONTINUOUS
    Elizabeth shuts off the running water, thinking she’s heard
    something.
    ELIZABETH
    What?!
    She wipes her hands and heads for the front door, annoyed.
    EXT. DANIEL’S BUNGALOW — CONTINUOUS
    DANIEL
    (digging for his wallet)
    Here, I got about fifty dollars–
    Farhad grabs the wallet and flings it away, money flying.
    FARHAn
    Fifty dollars?? I lose everything!
    You give me truck! You give me
    home! You give me everything!
    Farhad’s whole arm shakes from fear and anger.
    INT. DANIEL’S BUNGALOW CONTINUOUS
    As Lara suddenly has a horrible realization …
    LARA
    (turns to Mom)
    He hasn’t got it!
    ELIZABETH
    (approaching) .
    Hasn’t got what?
    LARA
    I have it! He hasn’t
    got his ‘penetrable
    cloak!
    DANIEL
    I don’t know what you’re
    talking about, it’s not my
    house, I don’t have that
    kind of money!
    FARHAD
    You lie! Give me everything!
    DANIEL
    You want the truck? It’s not mine! Take it!
    Lara bolts out the door. Elizabeth chases after her.
    ELIZABETH
    Lara? LARA!
    EXT. DANIEL’S BUNGALOW — CONTINUOUS

    Lara almost flies down the walk and across the grass.
    LARA
    Daddy!
    FARHAD
    You lie! You cheat me!
    You son-of-a-
    Daniel doesn’t see her coming until she’s almost upon him, leaping into his arms. Just as Farhad’s finger jerks on the trigger …. BANG! The bullet hits Lara straight in the back
    FARHAD (CONT’ D)
    (in horror)
    AHHHHH.
    ELIZABETH
    (running)
    Lara!!!! !
    Daniel knows she is dead without even looking. The horror registers on his face — and on Farhad’s.
    But then, Daniel forgot something. Lara’s wearing her impenetrable cloak. Which is why she’s able to lift her head and look into his eyes.
    LARA
    It’s okay, Daddy. I’ll protect you.
    DANIEL
    What?
    Daniel feels her back, no sign of a wound, no sign of a hole, this is impossible. Elizabeth is right there, throwing her arms around her daughter and husband. Farhad looks at his smoking gun. It falls to his side.
    ELIZABETH
    Baby!
    Farhad opens his mouth to apologize but can’t say anything.
    Daniel just stares at Farhad, then walks his family toward his house.
    LARA
    (whispers in his ear)
    It’s a really good cloak.
    He closes the door behind them. Leaving …
    FARHAD
    standing on the street his mind reeling, neighbors staring.

    1. Scott says:

      Good one, B&W. In some ways, culture clash was at the center of the movie Crash.

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