Daily Dialogue theme for next week: Sales Pitch

April 19th, 2014 by

We move from this week’s theme (Job Interview) suggested by blueneumann. Next week: Sales Pitch.

“Listen, I’m not here to tell you about Jesus. You already know about Jesus. He either lives in your heart or he doesn’t. Every woman wants choices, but in the end, none wants to be one of a hundred in a box. She’s unique. She makes the choices and she’s chosen him. She wants to tell the world he’s MINE. He belongs to ME, not you. She marks her man with her lips. He’s her possession.
You’ve given the gift of total ownership.”

The usual drill:

* Copy/paste dialogue from IMDB Quotes or some other transcript source.

* Copy/paste the URL of an accompanying video from YouTube or some other video source.

I’d also ask you to think about why the dialogue is notable. Is there anything about the dialogue which provides some takeaway re screenwriting?

Here is our lineup for upcoming Daily Dialogue themes:

April 28-May 5: Nemesis [Alejandro]

May 6-May 12: Lying

May 13-May 19: Advice [Aarthi Ramanathan]

May 20-May 26: Robbery

May 27-June 2: Time Travel Talk [Bob_Reo_Inc]

June 3-June 9: Bad News

June 10-June 16: Flirting [SabinaGiado]

June 17-June 23: Happy Birthday

Hit Reply and see you in comments for your suggestions: Sales Pitch.

Daily Dialogue — April 19, 2014

April 19th, 2014 by

Pam: Well, Brennan, you certainly have had a lot of jobs.
Brennan: I’m a bit of a spark plug. And, Human Resources lady, when I think…
Pam: You know, it’s… Actually, it’s Pam.
Brennan: I’m sorry. Well, Pan…
Pam: No, my name is Pam.
Brennan: Are you saying Pan or Pam?
Pam: I’m saying Pam.
Brennan: Yeah, I’m sorry.
Pam: Who is this gentleman sitting behind you?
Dale: Hello, Ms. Lady. I’m Dale. I’m Brennan’s stepbrother… and I think I might be able to help
with the Pan-Pam dilemma.

Step Brothers (2008), screenplay by Will Ferrell & Adam McKay, story by Will Ferrell & Adam McKay & John C. Reilly

The Daily Dialogue theme for the week: Job Interview, suggested by blueneumann.

Trivia: Adam McKay wanted to make this a drama, not a comedy.

Dialogue On Dialogue: Job interviews are almost by definition awkward, which makes them a natural for comic talent who specialize in awkward humor like Ferrell, Reilley and McKay.

Daily Dialogue — April 18, 2014

April 18th, 2014 by

“Why shouldn’t I work for the N.S.A.? That’s a tough one, but I’ll take a shot. Say I’m working at N.S.A. Somebody puts a code on my desk, something nobody else can break. Maybe I take a shot at it and maybe I break it. And I’m real happy with myself, ’cause I did my job well. But maybe that code was the location of some rebel army in North Africa or the Middle East. Once they have that location, they bomb the village where the rebels were hiding and fifteen hundred people I never met, never had no problem with, get killed. Now the politicians are sayin’, “Oh, send in the Marines to secure the area” ’cause they don’t give a shit. It won’t be their kid over there, gettin’ shot. Just like it wasn’t them when their number got called, ’cause they were pullin’ a tour in the National Guard. It’ll be some kid from Southie takin’ shrapnel in the ass. And he comes back to find that the plant he used to work at got exported to the country he just got back from. And the guy who put the shrapnel in his ass got his old job, ’cause he’ll work for fifteen cents a day and no bathroom breaks. Meanwhile, he realizes the only reason he was over there in the first place was so we could install a government that would sell us oil at a good price. And, of course, the oil companies used the skirmish over there to scare up domestic oil prices. A cute little ancillary benefit for them, but it ain’t helping my buddy at two-fifty a gallon. And they’re takin’ their sweet time bringin’ the oil back, of course, and maybe even took the liberty of hiring an alcoholic skipper who likes to drink martinis and fuckin’ play slalom with the icebergs, and it ain’t too long ’til he hits one, spills the oil and kills all the sea life in the North Atlantic. So now my buddy’s out of work and he can’t afford to drive, so he’s got to walk to the fuckin’ job interviews, which sucks ’cause the shrapnel in his ass is givin’ him chronic hemorrhoids. And meanwhile he’s starvin’, ’cause every time he tries to get a bite to eat, the only blue plate special they’re servin’ is North Atlantic scrod with Quaker State. So what did I think? I’m holdin’ out for somethin’ better. I figure fuck it, while I’m at it why not just shoot my buddy, take his job, give it to his sworn enemy, hike up gas prices, bomb a village, club a baby seal, hit the hash pipe and join the National Guard? I could be elected president.”

Good Will Hunting (1997), written by Matt Damon, Ben Affleck

The Daily Dialogue theme for the week: Job Interview, suggested by blueneumann. Today’s suggestion by Michael Corcoran.

Trivia: At a WGA seminar in 2003, William Goldman denied the persistent rumor that he was the actual writer of Good Will Hunting: “I would love to say that I wrote it. Here is the truth. In my obit it will say that I wrote it. People don’t want to think those two cute guys wrote it. What happened was, they had the script. It was their script. They gave it to Rob [Reiner] to read, and there was a great deal of stuff in the script dealing with the F.B.I. trying to use Matt Damon for spy work because he was so brilliant in math. Rob said, “Get rid of it.” They then sent them in to see me for a day – I met with them in New York – and all I said to them was, “Rob’s right. Get rid of the F.B.I. stuff. Go with the family, go with Boston, go with all that wonderful stuff.” And they did. I think people refuse to admit it because their careers have been so far from writing, and I think it’s too bad. I’ll tell you who wrote a marvelous script once, Sylvester Stallone. Rocky’s a marvelous script. God, read it, it’s wonderful. It’s just got marvelous stuff. And then he stopped suddenly because it’s easier being a movie star and making all that money than going in your pit and writing a script. But I did not write [Good Will Hunting], alas. I would not have written the “It’s not your fault” scene. I’m going to assume that 148 percent of the people in this room have seen a therapist. I certainly have, for a long time. Hollywood always has this idea that it’s this shrink with only one patient. I mean, that scene with Robin Williams gushing and Matt Damon and they’re hugging, “It’s not your fault, it’s not your fault.” I thought, Oh God, Freud is so agonized over this scene. But Hollywood tends to do that with therapists.” As of 2009, Matt Damon and Ben Affleck have both co-written one other script each, although not with each other; Damon co-wrote Gerry (2002) with Gus Van Sant and Ben’s brother Casey Affleck, and Ben Affleck directed and co-wrote (with his childhood friend Aaron Stockard) the script for Gone Baby Gone (2007). In 2010, Ben Affleck directed The Town (2010), for which he had also co-written the screenplay.

Dialogue On Dialogue: Long monologues are a real challenge. They have to be great to work. This job interview monologue is great.

Daily Dialogue — April 17, 2014

April 17th, 2014 by

Miranda Priestly: So you don’t read Runway.
Andy Sachs: No.
Miranda Priestly: And until today you had never heard of me.
Andy Sachs: No.
Miranda Priestly: You have no sense of fashion…
Andy Sachs: I think that depends on…
Miranda Priestly: No, no, that wasn’t a question.

The Devil Wears Prada (2006), screenplay by Aline Brosh McKenna, novel by Lauren Weisberger

The Daily Dialogue theme for the week: Job Interview, suggested by blueneumann. Today’s suggestion by @lisap1999.

Trivia: On the first day of filming, Meryl Streep told Anne Hathaway “I think you’re perfect for the role. I’m so happy we’re going to be working together.” Then she paused and followed it up with “That’s the last nice thing I’ll say to you.” And it was.

Dialogue On Dialogue: The introduction to Miranda is so great, building up her character to almost mythic proportions, which lays the groundwork for the job ‘interview’… interrogation is more like it!

Daily Dialogue — April 16, 2014

April 16th, 2014 by

“I… am the Waffler. With my griddle of justice, I BASH the enemy in the head, or I burn them like so! I also have some truth syrup, which is low in fat.”

Mystery Men (1999), written by Neil Cuthbert, created by Bob Burden

The Daily Dialogue theme for the week: Job Interview, suggested by blueneumann.

Trivia: The Mystery Men were the supporting cast of an underground superhero comic book called the Flaming Carrot. Mr. Furious and the Shoveler were the only ones from the comic to make it into the movie. Captain Amazing was created as a replacement for the Flaming Carrot, who was felt to be too bizarre to bring to the silver screen.

Dialogue On Dialogue: Not everyday you get to see a job interview… for a superhero gig.

Daily Dialogue — April 15, 2014

April 15th, 2014 by

Peter Gibbons: The thing is, Bob, it’s not that I’m lazy, it’s that I just don’t care.
Bob Porter: Don’t… don’t care?
Peter Gibbons: It’s a problem of motivation, all right? Now if I work my ass off and Initech ships a few extra units, I don’t see another dime, so where’s the motivation? And here’s something else, Bob: I have eight different bosses right now.
Bob Slydell: I beg your pardon?
Peter Gibbons: Eight bosses.
Bob Slydell: Eight?
Peter Gibbons: Eight, Bob. So that means that when I make a mistake, I have eight different people coming by to tell me about it. That’s my only real motivation is not to be hassled, that and the fear of losing my job. But you know, Bob, that will only make someone work just hard enough not to get fired.

Office Space (1999), screenplay by Mike Judge

The Daily Dialogue theme for the week: Job Interview, suggested by blueneumann. Today’s suggestion by @lisap1999.

Trivia: A square peg in a round hole is an idiomatic expression which describes the unusual individualist who could not fit into a niche of his or her society. The company, Initech, had a statue at the entrance of a square peg in a round hole.

Dialogue On Dialogue: This is a twist on a job interview, one where someone already employed is interviewed about his behavior by co-workers. Such a funny movie, happy to see it become a cult classic once it hit video.

Daily Dialogue — April 14, 2014

April 14th, 2014 by

Chris Gardner: So the truth is, I was arrested for failure to pay parking tickets.
Jay Twistle [incredulous]: Parking tickets?
Chris: I ran all the way here from Polk Station, the police station.
Martin Frohm: What were you doing before you were arrested?
Chris: I was… uh… painting my apartment.
Martin: Is it dry now?
Chris: I hope so.
Martin: Jay says you’re pretty determined.
Jay: Oh, he’s been waiting outside the front of the building with some forty pound gizmo for over a month.
Martin: He said you’re smart.
Chris: I’d like to think so.
Martin: And you want to learn this business?
Chris: Yes sir, I want to learn this business.
Martin: Have you already started learning on your own?
Chris: Absolutely.
Martin: Jay.
Jay: Yes sir.
Martin: How many times have you seen Chris?
Jay: I don’t know. One too many apparently.
Martin: Has he ever dressed like this?
Jay: No. Jacket and tie.
Martin: First in your class in school? High school?
Chris: Yes sir.
Martin: How many in the class?
Chris: Uh, twelve. It was a small town.
Martin: I’ll say.
Chris: But I was also first in my radar class in the Navy, and that was a class of twenty.

Silence.

Chris: Can I say something? I’m the type of person that if you ask me a question and I don’t know the answer, I’m gonna tell you, I don’t know. But I bet you what. I know how to find the answer. And I will find the answer. Is that fair enough?

Silence.

Martin: What would you say if a guy walked in for an interview without a shirt on? And I hired him. What would you say?

Silence.

Chris: He musta had on some really nice pants.

The Pursuit of Happyness (2006), written by Steve Conrad

The Daily Dialogue theme for the week: Job Interview, suggested by blueneumann.

Trivia: Dan Castellaneta, who voices Homer Simpson on The Simpsons (1989), co-stars in the film as one of Gardner’s superiors and requests a donut from Gardener. This is a nod to Casellaneta’s animated counterpart who shares a similar taste for donuts.

Dialogue On Dialogue: Everything leads up to that last line as it demonstrates Chris’s quick mind. Moreover it’s just a flat-out great line.

Daily Dialogue — April 13, 2014

April 13th, 2014 by

Indiana: There’s a big snake in the plane, Jock!
Jock: Oh, that’s just my pet snake Reggie.
Indiana: I hate snakes, Jock! I hate ‘em!
Jock: Come on! Show a little backbone, will ya!

Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981), screenplay by Lawrence Kasdan and George Lucas, story by Philip Kaufman

The Daily Dialogue theme for the week: Fear, suggested by Gordon.

Trivia: Despite having the dream team of George Lucas and Steven Spielberg behind the film, it was initially turned down by every studio in Hollywood. Only after much persuasion did Paramount agree to do it.

Dialogue On Dialogue: In Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade, we see a young Indy fall into a crate of snakes on a circus train. That triggered his fear of them.

Daily Dialogue theme for next week: Job Interview

April 12th, 2014 by

We move from this week’s theme (Fear) suggested by Gordon. Next week: Job interview, suggested by blueneumann.

The usual drill:

* Copy/paste dialogue from IMDB Quotes or some other transcript source.

* Copy/paste the URL of an accompanying video from YouTube or some other video source.

I’d also ask you to think about why the dialogue is notable. Is there anything about the dialogue which provides some takeaway re screenwriting?

Here is our lineup for upcoming Daily Dialogue themes:

April 21-April 27: Sales Pitch

April 28-May 5: Nemesis [Alejandro]

May 6-May 12: Lying

May 13-May 19: Advice [Aarthi Ramanathan]

May 20-May 26: Robbery

May 27-June 2: Time Travel Talk [Bob_Reo_Inc]

June 3-June 9: Bad News

June 10-June 16: Flirting [SabinaGiado]

June 17-June 23: Happy Birthday

Hit Reply and see you in comments for your suggestions: Job Interview!

Daily Dialogue — April 12, 2014

April 12th, 2014 by

“HAL: I’m afraid. I’m afraid, Dave. Dave, my mind is going. I can feel it. I can feel it. My mind is going. There is no question about it. I can feel it. I can feel it. I can feel it. I’m a… fraid.”

2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), written by Stanley Kubrick and Arthur C. Clarke

The Daily Dialogue theme for the week: Fear, suggested by Gordon.

Trivia: The full text of the Zero Gravity Toilet Instructions: ZERO GRAVITY TOILET PASSENGERS ARE ADVISED TO READ INSTRUCTIONS BEFORE USE – 1. The toilet is of the standard zero-gravity type. Depending on requirements, System A and/or System B can be used, details of which are clearly marked in the toilet compartment. When operating System A, depress lever and a plastic dalkron eliminator will be dispensed through the slot immediately underneath. When you have fastened the adhesive lip, attach connection marked by the large “X” outlet hose. Twist the silver coloured ring one inch below the connection point until you feel it lock. – 2. The toilet is now ready for use. The Sonovac cleanser is activated by the small switch on the lip. When securing, twist the ring back to its initial-condition, so that the two orange lines meet. Disconnect. Place the dalkron eliminator in the vacuum receptacle to the rear. Activate by pressing the blue button. – 3. The controls for System B are located on the opposite wall. The red release switch places the uroliminator into position; it can be adjusted manually up or down by pressing the blue manual release button. The opening is self adjusting. To secure after use, press the green button which simultaneously activates the evaporator and returns the uroliminator to its storage position. – 4. You may leave the lavatory if the green exit light is on over the door. If the red light is illuminated, one of the lavatory facilities is not properly secured. Press the “Stewardess” call button on the right of the door. She will secure all facilities from her control panel outside. When green exit light goes on you may open the door and leave. Please close the door behind you. – 5. To use the Sonoshower, first undress and place all your clothes in the clothes rack. Put on the velcro slippers located in the cabinet immediately below. Enter the shower. On the control panel to your upper right upon entering you will see a “Shower seal” button. Press to activate. A green light will then be illuminated immediately below. On the intensity knob select the desired setting. Now depress the Sonovac activation lever. Bathe normally. – 6. The Sonovac will automatically go off after three minutes unless you activate the “Manual off” over-ride switch by flipping it up. When you are ready to leave, press the blue “Shower seal” release button. The door will open and you may leave. Please remove the velcro slippers and place them in their container. – 7. If the red light above this panel is on, the toilet is in use. When the green light is illuminated you may enter. However, you must carefully follow all instructions when using the facilities during coasting (Zero G) flight. Inside there are three facilities: (1) the Sonowasher, (2) the Sonoshower, (3) the toilet. All three are designed to be used under weightless conditions. Please observe the sequence of operations for each individual facility. – 8. Two modes for Sonowashing your face and hands are available, the “moist-towel” mode and the “Sonovac” ultrasonic cleaner mode. You may select either mode by moving the appropriate lever to the “Activate” position. If you choose the “moist-towel” mode, depress the indicated yellow button and withdraw item. When you have finished, discard the towel in the vacuum dispenser, holding the indicated lever in the “active” position until the green light goes on… showing that the rollers have passed the towel completely into the dispenser. If you desire an additional towel, press the yellow button and repeat the cycle. – 9. If you prefer the “Sonovac” ultrasonic cleaning mode, press the indicated blue button. When the twin panels open, pull forward by rings A & B. For cleaning the hands, use in this position. Set the timer to positions 10, 20, 30 or 40… indicative of the number of seconds required. The knob to the left, just below the blue light, has three settings, low, medium or high. For normal use, the medium setting is suggested. – 10. After these settings have been made, you can activate the device by switching to the “ON” position the clearly marked red switch. If during the washing operation, you wish to change the settings, place the “manual off” over-ride switch in the “OFF” position. you may now make the change and repeat the cycle.

Dialogue On Dialogue: Ironic isn’t it that HAL says, “I’m afraid.” It calls back this dialogue:

Dave Bowman: Open the pod bay doors, HAL.
HAL: I’m sorry, Dave. I’m afraid I can’t do that.

This spotlights the switch in power positions, first with HAL in charge, then Dave.