Daily Dialogue — January 25, 2015

January 25th, 2015 by

“I’m giving you a choice. Either put on your glasses, or start eating that trash can.”

They Live (1986), screenplay by John Carpenter, short story by Ray Nelson

The Daily Dialogue theme for the week: Threat.

Trivia: Writer-director John Carpenter has said of this movie that it was a critique of Reaganomics, a “vehicle to take on Reaganism”.

Dialogue On Dialogue: If you haven’t seen this movie, it’s a hoot. There’s another side of dialogue even more memorable: “I have come here to chew bubble gum and kick ass, and I’m all out of bubble gum.”

If you have a suggestion for this week’s theme, please post in comments.

Daily Dialogue theme next week: Espionage

January 24th, 2015 by

The Daily Dialogue theme for next week: Espionage.

“FBI, CIA, ONI… we’re all in the same alphabet soup.”

The usual drill:

* Copy/paste dialogue from IMDb Quotes or some other transcript source.

* Copy/paste the URL of an accompanying video from YouTube or some other video source.

I’d also ask you to think about why the dialogue is notable. Is there anything about the dialogue which provides some takeaway re screenwriting?

Here is our lineup for upcoming Daily Dialogue themes:

February 2-February 8: Pets
February 9-February 15: Elation
February 16-February 22: Prison
February 23-March 1: Birthday
March 2-March 8: Chase
March 9-March 15: Reunion
March 16-March 22: Competition
March 23-March 29: Ghost
March 30-April 5: Foreigner
April 6-April 12: Interrogation
April 13-April 19: Amnesia
April 20-April 26: Betrayal
April 27-May 3: Stammer
May 4-May 10: Graduation

Check this out: The GITS Daily Dialogue Topic Index! You can read about Liz and Allie, two sisters who are big fans of the blog, and were inspired to create the index. A great resource for writers looking for inspiration for their own dialogue writing. You can be a part of this proud tradition with your ideas for weekly themes and Daily Dialogue suggestions.

Please post your ideas for this week’s theme — Espionage — in comments. Thanks!

Daily Dialogue — January 24, 2015

January 24th, 2015 by

“But I hope you leave enough room for my fist ‘coz I’m going to ram it into your stomach and break your goddamn spine!”

The Running Man (1987), screenplay by Steven E. de Souza, novel by Stephen King

The Daily Dialogue theme for the week: Threat.

Trivia: This film is loosely based on a novel written by Stephen King that he penned under the pseudonym of Richard Bachman. He wrote the story in 72 hours.

Dialogue On Dialogue: Can’t have a series of movie threats without quoting Arnold.

If you have a suggestion for this week’s theme, please post in comments.

Daily Dialogue — January 23, 2015

January 23rd, 2015 by

“I’ll get you, my pretty, and your little dog, too!”

The Wizard of Oz (1939), screenplay by Noel Langley & Florence Ryerson and Edgar Allan Woolf, adaptation by Noel Langley, book by L. Frank Baum

The Daily Dialogue theme for the week: Threat.

Trivia: In 1898, Dorothy Louise Gage was born to the brother and sister-in-law of Maud Gage Baum, wife of author L. Frank Baum. When little Dorothy died exactly five months later, Maud was heartbroken. Baum was just finishing “The Wonderful Wizard of Oz” and, to comfort his wife, named his heroine after Dorothy, changing her last name to Gale in his second book. Dorothy Gage was buried in Evergreen Memorial Cemetery in Bloomington, Illinois, where her grave was forgotten until 1996 when it was rediscovered. When Mickey Carroll, one of the last existing Munchkins from the movie, learned of the discovery, he was eager to replace her deteriorated grave marker with a new one created by his own monument company. The new stone was dedicated in 1997 and the children’s section of the cemetery renamed the Dorothy L. Gage Memorial Garden, in the hope that bereaved families would be comforted in thinking of their lost children as being with Dorothy from “The Wizard of Oz”.

Dialogue On Dialogue: One of the most memorable lines of threatening dialogue in cinema history.

If you have a suggestion for this week’s theme, please post in comments.

Daily Dialogue — January 22, 2015

January 22nd, 2015 by

“I’m going to bring the whole fucking disease corrupt temple down on your head. It’s going to biblical.”

Law Abiding Citizen (2009), written by Kurt Wimmer

The Daily Dialogue theme for the week: Threat.

Trivia: At one point Frank Darabont was attached to direct and was revising Kurt Wimmer’s original draft until leaving due to “creative differences.” Once F. Gary Gray came on-board to direct, David Ayer, Jordan Roberts and Sheldon Turner each took cracks at the script.

Dialogue On Dialogue: Revenge is a great motivator, perhaps the purest from a cinematic standpoint. Here we see a threat steeped in it.

If you have a suggestion for this week’s theme, please post in comments.

Daily Dialogue — January 21, 2015

January 21st, 2015 by

Mad Dog Tannen and his gang tow Marty McFly through the town at the end of a rope, ending at the new court house construction.

TANNEN: We got ourselves a new court house. High time we had a hangin’.

Tannen wraps the rope around Marty’s neck and Marty is hauled skyward. A moment later, Doc Brown steps into the scene, takes aim and shoots the rope holding Marty. Doc cocks the rifle again and aims it directly at Tannen.

DOC: I’ll shoot the fleas off a dog’s back at 500 yards, Tannen. Have it pointed straight at your head.

Tanner motions for his gang to back down.

TANNEN: You owe me money, blacksmith.
DOC: How do you figure?
TANNEN: My horse threw a shoe. Seein’ as you was the one that done the shoe-in’ I say that makes you responsible.
DOC: Well, since you never paid me for the job I say that makes us even.
TANNEN: Wrong! See, I was on my horse when it threw the shoe and I got throwed off. That caused me to bust a perfectly good bottle of fine Kentucky Red Eye. So, the way I figure it, blacksmith, you owe me five dollars for the whisky and seventy-five dollars for the horse.
Marty: That’s the eighty dollars!
DOC: Look, if your horse threw a shoe bring him back and I’ll re-shoe him.
TANNEN: I done shot that horse!
DOC: Well, that’s your problem, Tannen!
TANNEN: Wrong, that’s your’s. So, from now on, you better be looking’ behind you when you walk, ’cause one day you’re gonna get a bullet in your back.

Tanner and his gang ride out of town.

Back to the Future III (1990), screenplay by Bob Gale, story by Robert Zemeckis & Bob Gale, characters by Robert Zemeckis & Bob Gale

The Daily Dialogue theme for the week: Threat. Today’s suggestion by Will King.

Trivia: The town was in Jamestown, California, and was, in an eerily fitting way, destroyed by lightning in 1996.

Dialogue On Dialogue: Commentary by Will: “Doc steps out of his generally goofy persona and stands up to the town bully in order to save Marty, complete with a gun that makes a Kentucky long rifle jealous.”

If you have a suggestion for this week’s theme, please post in comments.

Daily Dialogue — January 20, 2015

January 20th, 2015 by

Wyatt Earp: All right, Clanton… you called down the thunder, well now you’ve got it! You see that? [pulls open his coat, revealing a badge] It says United States Marshal!
Ike Clanton: [terrified, pleading] Wyatt, please, I…
Wyatt Earp: [referring to Stilwell, laying dead] Take a good look at him, Ike… ’cause that’s how you’re gonna end up! [shoves Ike down roughly with his boot] The Cowboys are finished, you understand? I see a red sash, I kill the man wearin’ it! [lets Ike up to run for his life] So run, you cur… RUN! Tell all the other curs the law’s comin’! [shouts] You tell ‘em I’m coming… and hell’s coming with me, you hear?… [louder] Hell’s coming with me!

Tombstone (1993), written by Kevin Jarre

The Daily Dialogue theme for the week: Threat. Today’s suggestion by James Schramm.

Trivia: Kevin Jarre’s original script for Tombstone was significantly longer than the final film. It was intended to be an epic, detailing the lives of all the combatant parties in the story. After Jarre was fired as director, George P. Cosmatos hired John Fasano to trim the script to focus primarily on the Earp family (to make the already-delayed shoot more manageable). Fasano received co-author credit in early promotional materials, but his name was removed from the film’s credits (probably due to Writer Guild arbitration). Instead, Fasano was given an Associate Producer credit.

Dialogue On Dialogue: Commentary by James: “Is there a bigger threat one can make than bringing all of Hell with them? Great scene.”

If you have a suggestion for this week’s theme, please post in comments.

Daily Dialogue — January 19, 2015

January 19th, 2015 by

JENSEN: Get me out of here, Clay…
CLAY (O.S.) (THROUGH RADIO): There’s a fire exit thirty yards north of your position.

Jensen, heading for it…

BIG SECURITY 1 (O.S.): Freeze like a statue, pretty boy!

Jensen slow turns to find THREE GUNS trained straight at him. Major security. These guys look extremely competent.

JENSEN: I’m warning you, man, I’m a lethal weapon…

Jensen turns on the big fellah.

JENSEN: It was this secret government project. They did stuff to me. Spooky stuff. Anal stuff. Turned me into a dangerous Telekinetic. (wiggles index fingers) As the old saying goes – you don’t start none… there won’t be none.

Big Security 1 moves in on Jensen with a pair of handcuffs.

BIG SECURITY 1: Telekinetic your way out of this…

Jensen RAISES HIS RIGHT HAND at the guard. Fingers cocked like a gun aimed at the guard’s Kevlar covered vest.

JENSEN: Bang.

The guard is HIT HARD, BLASTED BACKWARDS off his feet! Screaming in pain, he goes down. Jensen spins, aims his left fingers at the SECOND GUARD…

JENSEN: Boom.

…and the second guard is blown backwards too, KEVLAR VEST SMOKING. Moaning:

BIG SECURITY 2: You broke my ribs…

Jensen – Fingers leveled at the THIRD GUARD…

THIRD GUARD: Please- d-don’t shoot…

TIGHT ON JENSEN: Full Dirty Harry.

JENSEN: Face down, or I’ll make your hearts stop beating with my mind.

They comply. Jensen looks down at them. Smiles. Then slowly turns looking out the FLOOR TO CEILING GLASS WINDOWS. Makes the “OK” sign out the window.

JENSEN: Thanks, Coug…

TIGHT ON THE CIRCLE OF JENSEN’S OK FINGER SIGN:

Three tight bullet holes in the glass. SMASH ZOOM out the window, 500 yards to a neighboring office tower…

INT. NEIGHBORING OFFICE BUILDING – HOUSTON – SAME

Rifle, still smoking. Hat low, the ever vigilant COUGAR.

COUGAR: De Nada.

The Losers (2010), screenplay by Peter Berg and James Vanderbilt, from the comics by Andy Diggle and Jock

The Daily Dialogue theme for the week: Threat. Today’s suggestion by Debbie Moon.

Trivia: The script is loosely inspired by “The Losers” stories ‘Ante Up’ (the Losers are nearly wiped out) and ‘Double Down’ (the Losers track down Max).

Dialogue On Dialogue: Commentary by Debbie: “A great use of a reversal: Jensen seems to be bluffing, his bluff is called, and turns out not to be a bluff after all…”

If you have a suggestion for this week’s theme, please post in comments.

Daily Dialogue — January 18, 2015

January 18th, 2015 by

“Oh my God. I’m back. I’m home. All the time, it was… We finally really did it. You maniacs! You blew it up! Ah, damn you! God damn you all to hell!”

Planet of the Apes (1968), screenplay by Michael Wilson and Rod Serling, novel by Pierre Boulle

Daily Dialogue theme for the week: Revelation.

Trivia: Michael Wilson was brought in to do a rewrite of Rod Serling’s screenplay. Wilson’s contribution is most evident in the kangaroo courtroom scene, Wilson being an embittered target of the blacklisting Joseph McCarthy “witchhunts” of the 1950s.

Dialogue On Dialogue: Classic Twilight Zone-like twist at the end. That figures seeing as the script was co-written by Rod Serling.

Daily Dialogue theme next week: Threat

January 17th, 2015 by

The Daily Dialogue theme for next week: Threat.

“You hang up on me again and I’ll gut you like a fish.”

In thinking about this theme, it made me realize… there are a lot of threats in movie dialogue. And across all genres. Horror, Thriller, Drama, Comedy, Science Fiction, etc. From overt to subtle, it seems like this is a dynamic often milked in Hollywood storytelling.

Let’s see what good examples we come up with this week!

The usual drill:

* Copy/paste dialogue from IMDb Quotes or some other transcript source.

* Copy/paste the URL of an accompanying video from YouTube or some other video source.

I’d also ask you to think about why the dialogue is notable. Is there anything about the dialogue which provides some takeaway re screenwriting?

Here is our lineup for upcoming Daily Dialogue themes:

January 26-February 1: Espionage
February 2-February 8: Pets
February 9-February 15: Elation
February 16-February 22: Prison
February 23-March 1: Birthday
March 2-March 8: Chase
March 9-March 15: Reunion
March 16-March 22: Competition
March 23-March 29: Ghost
March 30-April 5: Foreigner
April 6-April 12: Interrogation
April 13-April 19: Amnesia
April 20-April 26: Betrayal
April 27-May 3: Stammer
May 4-May 10: Graduation

Check this out: The GITS Daily Dialogue Topic Index! You can read about Liz and Allie, two sisters who are big fans of the blog, and were inspired to create the index. A great resource for writers looking for inspiration for their own dialogue writing. You can be a part of this proud tradition with your ideas for weekly themes and Daily Dialogue suggestions.

Please post your ideas for this week’s theme — Threat — in comments. Thanks!