On Writing

May 30th, 2016 by

Typewriter

“You write until the rust comes out of the faucet and it’s clear water. Then you write down the clear water.”

— Lin-Manuel Miranda

On Writing

May 23rd, 2016 by

Typewriter

“If I didn’t know the ending of a story, I wouldn’t begin. I always write my last line, my last paragraph, my last page first.”

— Katherine Anne Porter

On Writing

May 16th, 2016 by

Typewriter“Above all, watch with glittering eyes the whole world around you because the greatest secrets are always hidden in the most unlikely places. Those who don’t believe in magic will never find it.”

— Roald Dahl

On Writing

May 9th, 2016 by

Typewriter

“Talent is helpful in writing, but guts are absolutely necessary.”

— Jessamyn West

On Writing

May 2nd, 2016 by

Typewriter

“The two most engaging powers of an author are to make new things familiar and familiar things new.”

— Samuel Johnson

On Writing

April 25th, 2016 by

Typewriter

 

“Don’t be afraid to start. And more importantly, don’t be afraid to finish.”

— Chris Sparling

Via Twitter

On Writing

April 18th, 2016 by

Typewriter“Sneaking up on it sometimes helps: I’ve found I can be very productive for an hour before dinner, because there obviously isn’t enough time to really do anything, so I can tell myself I’m just screwing around.”

— Michael Crichton

Via Advice To Writers

On Writing

April 11th, 2016 by

Typewriter“Before I write the lead of a piece, I think the hardest part is how to begin. Then, once I have that done, I think the hardest part is the section that comes right after the lead. Then, of course, the ending. In other words, it’s all hard, just sequentially.”

— Susan Orlean

Via Advice To Writers

On Writing

April 4th, 2016 by

Typewriter

“Protect the time and space in which you write. Keep everybody away from it, even the people who are most important to you.”

— Zadie Smith

On Writing

March 28th, 2016 by

TypewriterThe bigger the word, the less emotion it conveys.

Avoid exclamation points!  Really!! Because they’re distracting!! Almost as much as CAPITALIZING THINGS!!!

Make sure that each scene gives us new information, rather than rehashing things we already know. Never tell us the same fact twice. Because it’s boring and stops the flow of the story. Never tell us the same fact twice. Because it’s boring and stops the flow of the story.

If the reader doesn’t know there’s intrigue a foot, there is no intrigue afoot.

Scenery without subtext is a travelogue.

Everything must be earned.  In story, there’s no such thing as a free lunch – unless, of course, it’s poisoned. Think Snow White. In other words, if it’s free, it’s going to cost you big time. (I refrained from using an exclamation point in that last sentence, I admit, it’s not easy! Oops.)

There are two basic motivating factors for just about all human action: Fear and Desire. Almost always, these two are pitted against each other.

The most important element of any story is to make the reader want to know what happens next. Period. Everything else is gravy.

— Lisa Cron

Via Advice To Writers