Update: The 10 Quest Initiative Finalists!

June 21st, 2013 by

If you are interested in learning the identities of the finalists for The Quest Initiative, hit MORE.

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“Nothing succeeds like failure”

June 20th, 2013 by

I want to continue to consider The Quest Initiative, specifically how to process the experience of not getting selected for it. I started into it with this post yesterday, the thrust of which is two points:

* I have been wrong before, so if I didn’t pick your story, use that as motivation: Write it, sell it and prove me wrong!

* If you are really passionate about your story, even if I didn’t select it, then write it. Ultimately creativity is about the relationship you have with your stories, so don’t be deterred, go for it.

I had planned on following up on that post because as I suggested yesterday as screenwriters we have to learn how to handle the losses and let-downs. Why? That is a constant dynamic in a professional screenwriter’s life.

Then lo and behold, The Fifth Ape posted this in comments:

First: Scott – You remain an absolute star.

Second: Here’s an interesting way of looking at the “failure” of not getting through:

There is a fantastic article about luck and how some people are luckier than others – This is not some karmic power that surges through the universe – it is simply that “lucky” people tend to do more, try more and are more open to opportunities.

This also means that they FAIL more too…
A “lucky” person will try 100 things this month, 10 will come off. They will fail 90 times.

An “unlucky” person will try 10 things this month, 1 will come off. They will only fail 9 times.

When we look at the first of these people we are inclined to say “lucky bastard”

We have to be open to enter things like this. All the time. If we enter more, we will fail more, but ultimately it might lead to something GREAT.

It’s a pretty long article – but well worth it:

http://youarenotsosmart.com/2013/05/23/survivorship-bias/

Now let’s get out there and make our own luck!

The Fifth Ape

The article is a good read as it uses logic to re-frame the perception of failure. Instead of thinking about it as… you know… failure, we should instead look at it as one more step toward success.

If, as The Fifth Ape suggests, the more times we fail, the more times we succeed, then instead of looking at failure as a negative, we can benefit by embracing it as a positive.

And that doesn’t even pull into consideration what we can learn from our failures.

As I was writing this, I was reminded of my high school tennis coach. I can only remember three things about him: his ruddy face, his buzzcut hair, and something he used to say quite often to us:

“Nothing succeeds like failure.”

I always thought that was the damnedest thing to say to a sports team. What, so you want us to fail? In retrospect, I think he was trying to plant a seed in us for our lives down the road, knowing that we would face inevitable failures, and recast how we might experience that.

And as I was strolling down that particular corner of Memory Lane, it occurred to me to see what other coaches and sports figures had to say about the subject. After all, a baseball player who fails to get a hit 7 out of 10 times at the plate can make the Hall of Fame which means by default they deal with a lot of failure. Here are a few choice quotes:

Success is never final, failure is never fatal. It’s courage that counts.
— John Wooden

I can accept failure. Everyone fails at something. But I can’t accept not trying.
— Michael Jordan

About the only problem with success is that it does not teach you how to deal with failure.
— Tommy Lasorda

The real glory is being knocked to your knees and then coming back. That’s real glory. That’s the essence of it.
— Vince Lombardi

So give that article cited above a read. Feel free to jot down any of the quotes as motivational tools. Or just determine to write that spec script to prove Scott Myers wrong.

Whatever it takes.

Because finding the courage and commitment to write is not only the only way to make things happen to further your career…

It’s also where the real glory is, that existential act of embracing your creativity and against all odds making something out of nothing.

I welcome your comments and any other resources you may have in this regard.

Onward and upward!

Update: The Quest Initiative

June 19th, 2013 by

After reviewing over 2,000 loglines that were submitted by nearly 1,000 writers for The Quest Initiative, I have whittled it down to 10 finalists. Starting right now, I will be sending emails to those 10 writers to begin the interview process. Assuming they are all interested in going forward, I will post their names here on Friday, June 21.

There are perhaps about 30 loglines I put onto a preliminary list. In addition, there are others who showed some promising creative instincts — for example, three good loglines, but not a great oneso I am making a list of those writers and may very well reach out to them once this entire Quest Initiative process plays itself out.

So if you do not receive an email today, I may still contact you.

Bottom line: I am moving forward toward selecting — hopefully — four writers to do The Quest beginning Monday, July 15.

BIG NOTE: I HAVE BEEN WRONG BEFORE!!!

Many, many times. So if you fail to receive an email from me, that does not necessarily mean your ideas aren’t good. As I have indicated all along, I set my standards of assessment re your loglines extremely high. Indeed that is what led to me inviting Max Millimeter to advise me in this process, I needed his hard-ass voice to remind me we’re looking for stories that can compete against the best ideas and scripts in Hollywood.

Which means you may have a solid story concept, even if I don’t contact you.

Moreover there is always the opportunity for you to Go On Your Own Quest [which you can read about at the end of this post here], so you can write a script, sell it for big bucks, and come back to laugh at me for not selecting you.

So if you don’t hear from me, do not feel bad. Rather use the experience to get motivated. Prepare to Go On Your Own Quest and write that damn script! Come up with more and better story concepts! Read scripts! Watch movies! Become better at the craft!

Congratulations to the 10 finalists. I will be emailing you starting now.

Here is the schedule related to The Quest Initiative:

June 19: I will email those of you who make the first cut. That will be determined strictly on the merits of your story concept and execution of your logline. Those writers will need to provide information including a writing resume [basically your background and history as a writer], story synopsis [if you have fleshed out anything more of your logline], writing sample [screenplay or screenplay excerpt, short story, novel excerpt], bio, plus a brief questionnaire.

June 21: Announce the finalists.

June 22: Information due from finalists.

June 24: Emails to writers to set up phone call interviews with me.

June 25-June 28: Interviews.

July 3: Contact the Questers.

July 8: Announce the Questers.

July 15: The Quest begins! Core [Theory]: 8 weeks.

September 9: Prep: 6 weeks.

October 21: Pages: 10 weeks.

December 29: The Quest ends!

For background on The Quest, go here and here.

UPDATE: I’m taking the liberty of posting some inspirational words from Natalie Peluso, something she uploaded at The Black Board:

Aw come on guys! The Quest would be amazingballs but isn’t the whole point of what we’re doing to write our scripts and be as prolific as we can be, regardless? I was grateful to have an opportunity to submit – but I was even more grateful for the kick in the pants to remind myself that the power to declare myself a ‘screenwriter’ is mine. 

I know from doing the Prep class with Tom that the greatest value from The Quest for me personally would be constant driving for progress and pages from Scott and my peers – the deadlines, the expectation. It’s all too easy to drift off without deadlines and sit on my hands instead of moving them vaguely near a keyboard. But I can demand these deadlines from myself, right?

I live in Brisbane with four children under 9. I feel so distant from Hollywood and the business and the networking that often I wonder whether my passion for screenwriting is a deep childish flaw, and perhaps I should just grow up. But who else is going to believe in me if I don’t?

For so many of us The Quest is more than a chance to finish a script, it’s validation. And as a performer for many years, I discovered that validation can only come from inside. No matter how many audiences applauded me or handed me flowers.

And if we’re really, truly writers – all of us – then that validation is ours for the taking! We should all just consider ourselves Questers as of today and declare ourselves successful simply for having the discipline and persistence to get the words out and on to paper.

Sending huge vibes of inspiration and chocolate-flavoured awesomeness to all of you! Good luck everyone for tomorrow – but even more luck for all the great stories waiting for us – finished! – at the end of the year. :)

Now that is the spirit, Natalie! And to everyone of you who I did not select for The Quest Initiative, I am summoning up a special brilliant batch of creative juju. It’s on this winding road right here:

You may not be able to see it right now, but trust me… set your foot on that path. Take a step. Another. And another. It is waiting for you. It may take awhile to find just the right blend of idea, plot, genre, time and energy, but if you persist and keep on the journey, you will find what you are meant to find. And along the way, that creative juju will be there… to help you go into your stories and find the animals.

Onward and upward!

Update: The Quest Initiative

June 17th, 2013 by

I have gone through all of the loglines submitted for The Quest Initiative, each and every single one of them. I didn’t count them as that would have slowed down my process considerably, but since most people included 2 or more loglines, my guess is the total tops 2,000.

What was it like reviewing 2,000+ loglines in a 72 hour period? I had a mix of emotions:

* Exhaustion: It’s a lot of work. But in a very real way, I think this condensed time-frame approach is the appropriate one because it really highlights the importance of what I am looking for: A strong story concept, one with a central conceit that jumps out of the crowd and hooks me right away. That’s important because I believe that’s what Hollywood buyers are looking for in a spec script [along with great writing, execution, etc].

* Surprise: There were some recurring themes and motifs that kept popping up. I’ll get into that in a future post after the dust has settled, but some of you were clearly on similar tracks in terms of story concepts.

* Impressed: I’d say on the whole, the quality of the loglines — speaking strictly about how they were constructed — was a notch above last year, so evidently folks have been doing their homework.

* Frustration: And yet a well-constructed logline does not necessarily translate into a winning story idea. While many submissions had some resemblance to what I could possibly conceive of as a movie, many did not. As Max Millimeter kept saying, “You cannot put fucking lipstick on a fucking pig.”

So the experience was a mixed bag. But I couldn’t help but come away from it with a sense of admiration that so many people are spending their time thinking creatively and having the courage to expose that creativity to someone else’s scrutiny.

Speaking of Max, he was a constant annoyance, hovering over my shoulder, spewing his creative vitriol at one logline after another, and yet his presence kept me locked on target in this review process. It is incredibly hard to set up a project in Hollywood, let alone get a movie made. He kept reminding me, “Ya’ wanna play with the big boys, ya’ gotta bring the high heat. The. High. Heat!”

What’s the hook? How would I sum up this story in 6 words? What’s the one thing about this logline that will get someone’s attention? Why is this a movie? Who is the audience? Is there an audience for this story? Can I really envision this opening on 3,000 screens? Do I really think millions of consumers will commit their own time and money to watch this story?

Those are the questions that kept rolling through my head as I went through 2,000+ loglines.

As a result, I have come up with a preliminary list of loglines submitted for The Quest Initiative which strike me as having potential based on the criteria I laid out multiple times in the run-up to the submissions period: Strong commercial, character-driven high-concepts with a focus on Action, Comedy, Thriller genres.

How many made that list? Again since I don’t know the actual total of loglines submitted, I’d have to guess, but I’d say we’re looking at 1%.

I am reviewing each logline on the list and will go through that series of questions noted above. I’m looking for High Heat, the best, most marketable story concepts. Based on that, I will end up with a list of writers who I will contact per the schedule below.

Now let’s address the elephant in the room: A vast majority of people who submitted loglines did not make this initial short list. The dull virtual silence of not getting an email from me on Wednesday will likely sting.

Part of this reality is due to the fact I am only targeting 4 writers maximum for The Quest Initiative. Short of someone finding a way to give me 36 hours in a day, I simply cannot take on any more Questers for free.

There’s also this: What I’m looking for in a story may not reflect what you’re looking for in a story. Your creative take on things could just be different than mine. What’s more, I could end up being flat-out wrong.

Still I understand there will be disappointed writers out there.

How to respond? Well, I would suggest you consider this part of the learning experience. Professional writers deal with disappointment — a lot. There’s not a writer in Hollywood, I suspect, who hasn’t been rewritten by another writer. There’s not a writer in Hollywood who hasn’t lost out on a writing assignment. Most of us have worked up pitches that didn’t sell. Written a pilot script or even produced pilot that didn’t get picked up. Had a movie released that underperformed or even bombed.

This kind of thing happens all the time.

The key question for any writer is how will s/he deal with that disappointment?

That’s the beauty of being a writer. Unlike actors or directors who, if something falls through, have to scurry around looking for another gig, writers can initiate a project. We can be proactive.

We can write.

Bottom line, if you don’t get selected and you truly believe in your story, then I encourage you to write it. If you need extra motivation, how about this: Prove me wrong! While I’d likely kick myself for not selecting your idea — my own disappointment! — nothing would make me happier than to see you pound out a spec script, get representation, and sell that baby.

I mean that in all honesty.

To that end as discussed previously, I will be providing a structure to facilitate you writing your next spec script, something that arose last year called Go On Your Own Quest. More details as we approach the July 15 start date.

Here is the schedule related to The Quest Initiative:

June 19: I will email those of you who make the first cut. That will be determined strictly on the merits of your story concept and execution of your logline. Those writers will need to provide information including a writing resume [basically your background and history as a writer], story synopsis [if you have fleshed out anything more of your logline], writing sample [screenplay or screenplay excerpt, short story, novel excerpt], bio, plus a brief questionnaire.

June 22: Information due from first round writers.

June 24: Emails to writers who make the second round to set up phone call interviews with me.

June 25-June 28: Interviews.

July 3: Contact the Questers.

July 8: Announce the Questers.

July 15: The Quest begins! Core [Theory]: 8 weeks.

September 9: Prep: 6 weeks.

October 21: Pages: 10 weeks.

December 29: The Quest ends!

Finally let me thank each of you who submitted loglines for The Quest Initiative. Yes, it was hard work for me, but I knew as I was going through your story ideas, they represented hard work from you. The fact you did that and considered me as someone you would deem worthy of considering your loglines, and potentially work with as a mentor was a humbling experience.

For me, this all goes back to January 1987,  when I was a Hollywood outsider. I had no formal training in screenwriting. All I had was a lifelong love of movies, a passion to learn the craft, three spec scripts I had written including one called K-9.

I have never forgotten those feelings and that state of mind, outside looking into Hollywood

That’s one big reason why I started this blog to give a point of contact online for aspiring screenwriters.

It’s also a chief consideration why I created The Quest to provide a coherent, comprehensive, character-based approach to screenwriting that grounded writers in both professional theory and practice.

I want to see more writers succeed and better movies in theaters.

I want to do whatever small thing I can to provide another path into Hollywood.

That’s what The Quest Initiative is all about.

Thanks again to everyone who submitted loglines.

Onward and upward!

Update: The Quest Initiative

June 14th, 2013 by

I have already started the process of reviewing your submissions, but I go into official “weekend read” mode beginning tonight, immersing myself in some 2,000 loglines sent to me by nearly 1,000 entrants.

Here is the schedule related to The Quest Initiative:

June 19: I will email those of you who make the first cut. That will be determined strictly on the merits of your story concept and execution of your logline. Those writers will need to provide information including a writing resume [basically your background and history as a writer], story synopsis [if you have fleshed out anything more of your logline], writing sample [screenplay or screenplay excerpt, short story, novel excerpt], bio, plus a brief questionnaire.

June 22: Information due from first round writers.

June 24: Emails to writers who make the second round to set up phone call interviews with me.

June 25-June 28: Interviews.

July 3: Contact the Questers.

July 8: Announce the Questers.

July 15: The Quest begins! Core [Theory]: 8 weeks.

September 9: Prep: 6 weeks.

October 21: Pages: 10 weeks.

December 29: The Quest ends!

Also Max Millimeter has resurfaced, so expect some of his unique brand of Hollywood wisdom in the next few weeks.

Onward and upward!

Update: The Quest Initiative

June 10th, 2013 by

Okay, so I guess you can all take a nice cleansing breath. Lots of creative energy and hard work expended on those loglines. And now that the submission period is officially closed, here are some totals:

Number of entrants: 981

Number of loglines: 2,000 (?)

Those numbers aren’t locked. There may be some duplicate emails. The actual total of loglines could be lower or higher depending upon how many of you submitted 2 or 3.

So the first order of business is to congratulate those of you who entered. It takes not only time and focus to pull together a logline [or loglines], it also takes courage to submit them. But courage is something you have to develop to succeed in the film and TV business, a fundamental belief in yourself and a willingness to put your creativity out there.

Okay, where do we go from here? Well, I’m going to review each and every single one of your loglines, just like I did last year. That will take some time. Here is my tentative schedule:

June 19: I will email those of you who make the first cut. That will be determined strictly on the merits of your story concept and execution of your logline. Those writers will need to provide information including a writing resume [basically your background and history as a writer], story synopsis [if you have fleshed out anything more of your logline], writing sample [screenplay or screenplay excerpt, short story, novel excerpt], bio, plus a brief questionnaire.

June 22: Information due from first round writers.

June 24: Emails to writers who make the second round to set up phone call interviews with me.

June 25-June 28: Interviews.

July 3: Contact the Questers.

July 8: Announce the Questers.

July 15: The Quest begins! Core [Theory]: 8 weeks.

September 9: Prep: 6 weeks.

October 21: Pages: 10 weeks.

December 29: The Quest ends!

While we are waiting for the announcement next week, here is something you can do: Note those dates in your calendar. If you get selected as a Quester, that’s going to be your writing life for the next half-year. And if you don’t make the final four, you can Go On Your Own Quest, using the same time-frame to inspire you to develop and pound through a first draft of your own script.

Finally I’d like to send out a blast of creative juju to everyone who submitted a logline for The Quest Initiative!

Whooooooosh! Consider yourselves sanctified in the waters of creative juju!

Now go write and see what magic happens!

UPDATE: Yes, an update on an update! Received a note from The Black Board Super Moderator Shaula Evans with this link featuring some strong favorable feedback about The Quest Initiative process, how it helped many writers think more seriously about story concept, work on their loglines and just generally kick-start their creative process.

Which is precisely some of the things I hoped would happen! So that makes me very happy!

And remember: We will be running Go On Your Own Quest as a partnership between GITS and The Black Board, so you can literally read daily posts here tied to theory and practice, then head over to The Black Board to workshop your own stories and scripts.

The Quest Initiative: Day 19

June 9th, 2013 by

The submission period for The Quest Initiative runs from May 22-June 9. Each day I will provide an update.

Today: Marks the 19th and final day of submissions for The Quest Initiative. Number of entrants: 783. Number of loglines [estimated]: 1300-1400.

Submission period closes tonight at midnight [Pacific]!

Question of the day: When may entrant who make the first cut expect to hear from you?

Answer: Wednesday, June 19 via email.

Tip of the Day: You may get selected for The Quest. But the simple fact is if I have set a limit of 4 possible participants in The Quest Initiative 2013, that means hundreds of you will not make the cut.

How to deal with that?

It’s important to know how to handle ‘defeat’ because – frankly – that is often the case for a working screenwriter.

You don’t land the gig.
You get fired.
You get rewritten.
Your movie bombs.
Your greenlit movie gets canned.

People may think of screenwriters as these milquetoast, slump-shouldered souls who lives in a virtual cave and have no backbone or spirit.

Wrong! Screenwriters have to be tough. We have to be resilient. We have to know how to handle the negative along with the positive.

My advice? Approach screenwriting like you’re a fan of the New York Mets.

This is a team that in 1962 set a Major League Baseball record for futility, losing a record 120 games.

Being a longtime Mets fan myself, I have learned to expect defeat and celebrate victories.

If the former, I shrug it off knowing in advance there was a good chance I wouldn’t win the ‘game,’ and plow ahead into my next writing project.

If the latter, I am delighted at the surprise turn of events, party with my friends… then plow ahead into my next writing project.

Do you see a pattern there?

Last year 21 writers made the first cut of The Quest Initiative, 8 eventually selected to participate.

2 of the 13 who did not make the final cut achieved success in Hollywood this year, one as a writer on TV series, the other signing a two-picture deal with a major studio.

And I couldn’t be happier for them.

So hope for the best. But prepare yourself for something less. And even if you do not get selected for The Quest Initiative 2013, that doesn’t mean your idea sucks, you suck, etc.

It just means that at this specific point in time, the group I choose fits my present interests.

I hope I choose you, but if not…

Get back to work on your next writing project.

If you have a great story idea, why not submit it for The Quest Initiative?

Submission period closes tonight at midnight [Pacific]!

For specifics on how to submit loglines and general background, hit more.

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The Quest Initiative: Day 18

June 8th, 2013 by

The submission period for The Quest Initiative runs from May 22-June 9. Each day I will provide an update.

Today: Marks the 18th day of submissions for The Quest Initiative. Number of entrants: 665. Number of loglines [estimated]: 1100-1200. Note: The pace of submissions is getting intense.

1 day left to apply. Submission period closes Sunday, June 9 at midnight!

NOTE: I had always intended the end date for the submission period to be Sunday. When I first posted information about this year, I simply got the date wrong and said the eighth. So again to be clear:

THE SUBMISSION PERIOD CLOSES TOMORROW, SUNDAY, JUNE 9 AT MIDNIGHT (PACIFIC).

Question of the day: A submitter retains all rights to the logline submitted to Quest, correct?

Answer: Yes. You retain all rights to your loglines. Moreover the only person to read all of the loglines is me, so your story ideas are completely secure.

If I select you for The Quest Initiative, we go through that process, and I decline to move forward with your project, it is yours free and clear, so in effect you will have gotten a 24 immersion in screenwriting theory and practice, and a first draft of a script, all for no cost.

If I we go through the process and I decide to move forward with your project attaching myself as a producer, you are still the writer of the project and owner of the IP. My role is producer, that’s it. Assuming we develop your script through rewrite process and it gets set up, your writing deal is exclusively yours. Whatever producing deal I can negotiate, that’s mine.

So in a nutshell, your story idea / logline is yours and remains yours. My involvement is as a mentor for the period of the Quest, then if we move forward as producer.

Tip of the Day: A good logline is both concise and clear. That is it is short, typically one sentence. But it also has to convey a sense of the story. For example, I just went through the list of spec scripts that have been set up thus far this year. Here are a couple of loglines that make this point:

One Night on the Hudson: Rookie cop and the criminal he caught go on the lam from crooked cops.

14 words and I get the story. Buddy picture, mismatched pair. Crooked cops = Bad Guys. On the lam = chase movie.

Capsule: A young man life is turned upside down when he begins to receive metallic capsules containing messages from his future self.

21 words. I get the central conceit: Messages from future self. I get the tone: These messages upend his life. The potential narrative isn’t clear to me and no indication of a Nemesis, but that main idea is intriguing enough that I’d want to know more.

However if this was a test between these two loglines in terms of their effectiveness, the first one would win because it’s both concise and clear.

NOTE: If any of you read a previous post about a writing exercise where you boil down your story to 6 words and thought that was what I wanted for your logline, that is not the case. It was simply a writing exercise to get you to see what the core narrative elements were, then build up your logline from that foundation.  If you submitted loglines thinking I wanted just 6 words and would like to revise and resubmit them, feel free to do that.

So look at your logline. Does it convey your story conceit? Does it lay out the story’s Protagonist? Does it convey the central conflict? Is it concise? Is it clear?

If you have a great story idea, one that is both concise and clear — and most importantly has a great story conceit — why not submit it for The Quest Initiative?

For specifics on how to submit loglines and general background, hit more.

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The Quest Initiative: Day 17

June 7th, 2013 by

The submission period for The Quest Initiative runs from May 22-June 9. Each day I will provide an update.

Today: Marks the 17th day of submissions for The Quest Initiative. Number of entrants: 554. Number of loglines [estimated]: 950-100. Note: The pace of submissions is picking up even more, presumably because there are only 2 days left to apply.

Question of the day: Will you be running Go On Your Own Quest again this year?

Answer: Yes. Even if you do not get selected for The Quest Initiative, we will reprise Go On Your Own Quest like we did last year. What that means is you can use the same structure of the 24 Quest program from July 15-December 29, 2013 to develop and write your own original screenplay. I will feature daily posts here on the blog Monday-Friday mirroring what the Questers are doing. In addition, The Black Board will have weekly forums also aligned with The Quest schedule.

You won’t be getting the lectures, exercises, teleconferences and mentoring the Questers will be receiving, but you can use the same framework to help steer you through the writing process.

Last year, dozens of writers did precisely that. And I know of at least one whose script landed them a representation with a top Hollywood management outfit.

GOYOQ is my way of supporting you as writers and encouraging you to write that script. After all, nothing happens until you have a completed screenplay in hand.

Tip of the Day: Test out your loglines on some writers you know. See what their reactions are. My next spec script has a logline I’ve tested with writers in the business and they all love it, so I feel confident going into this process.

If, on the other hand, you test your loglines and you get the proverbial “meh,” chances are that’s how I’ll react, too.

Send me your winning ideas. I’m looking for mainstream commercial high-concepts with the potential for great characters.

If you have a great story idea, one you’ve road-tested and it passes with flying colors, why not submit it for The Quest Initiative?

For specifics on how to submit loglines and general background, hit more.

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The Quest Initiative: Day 16

June 6th, 2013 by

The submission period for The Quest Initiative runs from May 22-June 9. Each day I will provide an update.

Today: Marks the 16th day of submissions for The Quest Initiative. Number of entrants: 460. Number of loglines [estimated]: 800. Note: The pace of submissions is picking up even more, presumably because there are only 3 days left to apply.

Question of the day: If I submitted one logline in an email, but now want to submit another one, may I do that?

Answer: Yes. While I prefer multiple loglines in one email, if you’ve come up with another one and want to add it to a previous submission, you may do in a 2nd email. Just remember, no more than three loglines per entrant.

Tip of the Day: This comes courtesy of a comment made by Traci Nell Peterson in response to today’s Business of Screenwriting post:

Apologies for lack of author/citation (can’t remember where I saw it), but the definition below is White Board Worthy, and consistent with what Scott repeats throughout this site:

“Marketable = intriguing concept that feels familiar and has great lead characters for A-list actors. What a producer/director/actor can say ‘Yes!’ to.”

This!

If you have a great story idea, one you think hits the mark of the quote above, why not submit it for The Quest Initiative?

For specifics on how to submit loglines and general background, hit more.

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